Winter 2019

Course offerings for the Winter 2019 semester include selections in Art, Classics, History, Literature, Music, Philosophy, Religious Studies and Theology, Social Science and Writing.


ART


Architecture Is a Liberal Art

12 weeks, Tuesdays , 6:15 PM - 8:15 PM

What can be done to make the untamed earth fit for human habitation? How does architecture foster conversing, remembering, cherishing, laughing, confessing, falling in love? How does our peculiarly inventive propensity to build interact with the other distinctive aspects of our humanness? Why do arguments have foundations, houses faces (facades), and columns feet? How are architectural ideas conceived, incubated, and shared? How do our ethical and spiritual assumptions and aspirations inform the shaping of wood, stone, concrete, steel, glass?



CLASSICS


The Classic Greek Historians (Part II)

12 weeks, Wednesdays 6:15 PM- 8:15 PM

This course will focus on fifth-century BCE Athens. Surveying Athens from the Greek-Persian wars to the beginning of its decline during the Peloponnesian War, we will ask: What justifies the claim that Herodotus and Thucydides are the fathers of history? What are the differences in their approaches to factual recording, narrative style, and portrayal of personality? Why are their works still studied today? And why is the period of Athenian glory for which these two provide an almost continuous account considered to be a turning point in Western civilization?



HISTORY


Wealth Inequality in History: The Four Horsemen of Levelling

12 weeks, Tuesdays, 1:30 PM - 3:30 PM

What factors contribute to the development of wealth inequality in a society? Why does wealth inequality matter? We will examine various examples of materially unequal societies, beginning with their emergence at the dawn of history (China, Rome, Japan). How has wealth inequality been viewed historically, and in modern times? How have people responded to wealth inequality in the past, and what means (political, social, economic) have been deployed—and with what success—to reduce inequality? How would we evaluate initiatives that address the issue?


From the Age of Chivalry to the Age of Exploration: 1300-1500 AD

12 weeks, Thursdays, 6:15 PM - 8:15 PM

What forces drove the transition from the Late Medieval Age of faith and feudalism to the Early Modern Age of science, global expansion, and absolute monarchy? What role(s) did the calamities of the 14th century play? How did the Renaissance worldview differ from the medieval—and how was it similar?



LITERATURE


Reading Milton`s Paradise Lost

12 weeks, Mondays, 1:30 PM - 3:30 PM

John Milton’s Paradise Lost is often considered the greatest work of literature in the English language. This course offers the opportunity of encountering its powerful rendering of an old story.


Orwell: A Writer for Our Times

12 weeks, Tursdays, 1:30 PM - 3:30 PM

George Orwell is considered an enormously important figure in our culture. How and why has his work become so central to our understanding of the previous century and of our own as well? Why does Orwell’s 1984 matter so much now, considering that it was published over 70 years ago? Big Brother, Doublethink, Newspeak are now part of our common vocabulary. Are the insights that ground the novel, our core text, timeless or merely prescient?

 

 


Orwell: A Writer of Our Times (Pointe-Claire)

12 weeks, Mondays, 1:30 PM - 3:30 PM

Address: St. John the Baptist Church, 233 Sainte-Claire Ave.

George Orwell is considered an enormously important figure in our culture. How and why has his work become so central to our understanding of the previous century and of our own as well? Why does Orwell’s 1984 matter so much now, considering that it was published over 70 years ago? Big Brother, Doublethink, Newspeak are now part of our common vocabulary. Are the insights that ground the novel, our core text, timeless or merely prescient?

 

 



MUSIC


More About Music (Part II)

24 weeks, Mondays, 1:30 PM - 3:30 PM

Have you ever wondered about what music was like before Mozart and Bach? Perhaps you have even thought of music in ancient Greece? You may have wondered why you find music of the twentieth century so baffling? Above all, do you feel that you would like to gain insight into the music you already love, and discover more of the same?

 



PHILOSOPHY


Martin Luther King, Jr. & the Quest for Justice

12 weeks, Mondays, 6:15 PM - 8:15 PM

What do we know of the man who led the civil rights crusade in the US in the 1950s and ‘60s and who was assassinated 50 years ago? Martin Luther King Jr. is often heralded for his call for a world in which his children would “not be judged by the colour of their skin but by the content of their character.” Is this vision of a colour-blind and integrated America the essence of his thought, an important component, or a first step—to be realized progressively in accordance with the promise of justice set forth in the Declaration of Independence, but never fulfilled?



RELIGIOUS STUDIES AND THEOLOGY


Biblical Narratives: A Literary Exploration

12 weeks, Wednesdays, 6:15 PM - 8:15 PM

The Bible is composed of a group of stories central to two major faiths, Judaism and Christianity. Though these tales help guide many of the faithful in their religious lives, the stories found within these books also helped shape secular Western thought, literature, art, and pop culture. These stories include those of David and Goliath, the Wisdom of Solomon, Cain and the murder of his brother Abel, and Jesus and the baptism in the river Jordan. This course will examine and explore these and other tales from a non-denominational perspective. Each story from the Bible will be analyzed in its own light and context.

 



WRITING


Through the Leaf-Mould: Speculative Fiction Writing

12 weeks, Mondays, 6:15 PM - 8:15 PM

Speculative fiction exercises our imaginations by asking, “What if?” Asking this question challenges writers to explore unusual viewpoints. Students will grow their story while developing storytelling skills such as worldbuilding, characterization, plot, and viewpoint. All finished drafts will then be critiqued by the entire class, enabling students to develop the ability to notice, describe, and fix problems in their own work.

 


Basic Essay Writing

12 weeks, Tuesdays, 6:15 PM - 8:15 PM

This course is designed as an essay writing workshop. The backbone of the course will be a series of compact take-home writing assignments—approximately one per class meeting. We will read, critique, and rewrite our own and each other’s works with an eye toward clarifying both the sense and the style of our writing. We will undertake, in short, a continual and intensive flow of reading, writing, critiquing, and rewriting.

 


Creative Non-fiction Writing Workshop

12 weeks, Thursdays, 6:15 PM - 8:15 PM

Are you an aspiring writer? If you have stories to share and are curious about the people and places you encounter, we’d love to have you join us in the Creative Non-Fiction Writing Workshop.

 


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